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Sex Offenders Much More Likely To Be Arrested For Sex Crimes
By Leonard A. Sipes, Jr.
Published: 06/17/2019

Arrested Recidivism based on new arrests, convictions and periods of incarceration is a vital measure of crime and criminal justice policy. See an overview at Offender Recidivism.

The report below on sex offenders provides recidivism data and much more; it offers arrest-conviction data for all offenders released from federal and state prisons and how many were arrested for new crimes versus technical violations (i.e., escape-absconding, refusing to go to programs, etc.).

Highlights

Sex offenders were more than three times as likely to be re-arrested for rape or sexual assault. Please keep in mind that sex offenses are vastly underreported and, because of their non-stranger component, problematic to investigate and prove. This finding is an undercount.

About two-thirds (67%) of released sex offenders were arrested at least once for any type of crime indicating that there are few specialists when it comes to criminality.

84% of all released prisoners were rearrested, the highest figure I’ve seen per national data.

99% of all released offenders were arrested for an offense other than a probation or parole violation. Considering the debate on offenders being returned to prison for technical violations, this figure is potentially explosive. “Almost all prisoners who were re-arrested (96% of released sex offenders and 99% of all released offenders) were arrested for an offense other than a probation or parole violation,” BJS Press Release.

BJS Report

State prisoners released after serving time for rape or sexual assault were more than three times as likely as other released prisoners to be re-arrested for rape or sexual assault during the 9 years following their release, per Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Released sex offenders represented 5% of prisoners released in 2005 and 16% of post-release arrests for rape or sexual assault during the 9-year follow-up period.

The BJS study tracked a representative sample of prisoners released in 2005 in the 30 states that were responsible for 77% of all state prisoners released nationwide and examined their arrests through 2014.

An estimated 7.7% of released sex offenders were arrested for rape or sexual assault during the 9-year follow up period, versus 2.3% of other released prisoners.

While rape and sexual assault offenders were more likely than other released prisoners to be arrested for rape or sexual assault, they were less likely than other released prisoners to be arrested for other crimes.

About two-thirds (67%) of released sex offenders were arrested at least once for any type of crime during the 9 years following their release, compared to about five-sixths (84%) of other released prisoners.

Almost all prisoners who were re-arrested (96% of released sex offenders and 99% of all released offenders) were arrested for an offense other than a probation or parole violation.

Overall, half of sex offenders released from prison had a subsequent arrest that led to a conviction. However, sex offenders were less likely than all released prisoners to have a new arrest resulting in a conviction.

At the end of the 9-year follow-up, 50% of sex offenders and 69% of all released prisoners had a new arrest that led to a conviction.

Sex offenders were more likely than other released prisoners to receive longer sentences and to be granted unconditional releases from prison. The median sentence length for sex offenders was 60 months versus 36 months for all state prisoners released in 30 states in 2005.

About 32% of sex offenders were granted an unconditional release and not placed on parole, probation or some other form of community supervision. About 26% of all released prisoners were granted an unconditional release.

The report, Recidivism of Sex Offenders Released from State Prison: A 9-Year Follow-Up (2005-14)is available on the BJS website at www.bjs.gov.

Source: Bureau Of Justice Statistics

Reprinted with permission from https://www.crimeinamerica.net.

Contact us at crimeinamerica@gmail.com or for media on deadline, use leonardsipes@gmail.com.

Leonard A. Sipes, Jr has thirty-five years of experience supervising public affairs for national and state criminal justice agencies. He is the Former Senior Specialist for Crime Prevention for the Department of Justice’s clearinghouse and the Former Director of Information Management for the National Crime Prevention Council. He has a Post Master’s degree from Johns Hopkins University and is the author of the book "Success With the Media". He can be reached via email at leonardsipes@gmail.com.


Comments:

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  4. ChronoTrigger on 06/19/2019:

    This article is a load of tripe. It was poorly written and the statistical info here is a jumbled mess. It is data soup that has little real meaning. Here is a better way to present the info: http://www.oncefallen.com/unique_threat_myth.html Why did the later report remove the hard numbers and only commented on reconviction rates in passing? Why did the BJS write a headline focusing on an intentionally misleading and pointless statistic? Why did the BJS not highlight the extremely low reconviction rates of people previously convicted of sex crimes? We can only speculate on motives. At the least, the BJS has engaged in misrepresentation of the BJS’s own statistics. If there is any doubt that the SMART Office has a vested interest in propagating this myth, then their reply to the Washington Post article should remove that doubt. In defending this misleading claim, the SMART Office responded: “The author asserted that Justice Alito’s statement on rearrest rates was a ‘misconception of sex offender recidivism.’ The data actually show that his statement is true, and more recent data on sex offender recidivism confirms higher rates of recidivism for certain types of sex offenders. Further, Justice Alito’s assertion, ‘Repeat sex offenders pose an especially grave risk to children,’ is valid for two reasons: 1) sex offenders who target boys and girls have higher rates of recidivism than other sex offenders and 2) we as a society have a particular responsibility to protect children from sexual assault.”[20] The SMART Office used two other studies showing higher re-arrest rates, including a multinational study that does not accurately portray American re-offense rates and mixes re-arrest rates and reconviction rates. The second statement made by SMART about society’s need to protect children from sexual assault has no bearing on the statistics but shows the intent of the SMART Office as promoting a high recidivism rate to support a personal agenda. To review this critique of the “unique threat” myth: People convicted of sex crimes commit subsequent sexual offenses at an extremely low rate, i.e., less than 1% are reconvicted annually. If you look at the number of released prisoners who subsequently commit a sex offense, chances are the offender has no previous sex crime conviction. People convicted of sex crimes engage in a subsequent sex crime less often than a person convicted of a particular non-sexual offense commits a subsequent sexual offense, such as a burglar engaging in a subsequent burglary. The 2019 BJS study omitted reconviction rates, a superior standard to re-arrest rates. This leads the reader into believing sex crime rates are higher than average. The Washington Post said it best: “The reference to sex offender rearrest trends in Alito’s opinion is quite misleading. It measures the likelihood of sex offenders to be arrested for sex crimes after release from prison, and compares it to the likelihood of non-sex offenders to be arrested for sex crimes after release. This makes it seem like recidivism among sex offenders to be a uniquely bad problem, but it is an apples-to-oranges comparison.” “This opinion cites previous opinions that use outdated data going back to the 1980s — more than 30 years ago. Moreover, it obscures the fact according to 2005 data, the percentage of sex offenders getting rearrested for the same crime is low compared to non-sex offenders, with the exception of people convicted of homicide. It does the public no service when the Supreme Court justices make a misleading characterization like this. We award Three Pinocchios.”

  5. AdamYoung69 on 06/18/2019:

    Although treatments do not reduce sexual offense, analysis promotes the viewpoint that treatment can lower sex offense and defend potential victims. Sex offenders are sometimes given or required to undergo treatments intended to reduce their sex drive. The most well known of these interventions can be reduced by undergoing treatment in any of the [url=https://www.saatwika.in] Ayurvedic hospital in Trivandrum [/url]

  6. AdamYoung69 on 06/18/2019:

    Although treatments do not reduce sexual offense, analysis promotes the viewpoint that treatment can lower sex offense and defend potential victims. Sex offenders are sometimes given or required to undergo treatments intended to reduce their sex drive. The most well known of these interventions can be reduced by undergoing treatment in any of the best ayurvedic hospitals in Kerala. For more info vist : https://www.saatwika.in/


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